Oct 26, 2014

How to Become an Elevator Inspector

Elevator inspection is an important part of the construction field and ensures that elevators and other devices are safe for public use. Elevator inspectors are trained professionals that perform a variety of inspection tasks on elevators and other related equipment.

What does an elevator inspector do?

Elevator inspectors examine a variety of lifting and conveying equipment including elevators, moving sidewalks, escalators, hoists and lifts, amusement rides, and inclined railways. They make sure the equipment is installed properly and functioning effectively and safely. They also supervise elevator maintenance and create safety tests for devices in climates with high humidity and those exposed to extreme temperatures, high wind speed, and other factors. Elevator inspectors typically work for safety agencies, government departments, and elevator installation and maintenance companies.

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What kind of training does an elevator inspector need?

Elevator inspectors typically need at least a high school diploma, but many employers prefer applicants with some type of formal training. Elevators inspectors must have a thorough knowledge of the components and mechanisms of a variety of lifting and conveying equipment. Many aspiring elevator inspectors complete internships to gain practical experience in the field. Most employers provide on the job training to enable new elevator inspectors to learn the necessary policies and procedures. New elevator inspectors typically begin by shadowing experienced workers and then move on to independent tasks after the gain the necessary skills and experience. Many employers require elevator inspectors to gain the Qualified Elevator Inspector designation. Elevator inspectors often complete continuing education and additional training to keep their skills up to date and stay abreast with advancements in the field.

What are the prospects for a career as an elevator inspector?

Employment of elevator inspectors is expected to grow faster than average for all professions, increasing 17% through 2018 (1). The growing population and increase in the installation of elevators in a variety of structures will drive job growth.

Job prospects are expected to be good, especially for elevator inspectors with advanced training and extensive experience. Some job openings will stem from the need to replace elevator inspectors that retire, transfer, or leave the field for other reasons.

How much do elevator inspectors make?

As of 2011, the middle 50% of elevator inspectors earn annual salaries between $47,225 and $69,685. The top 10% earn annual salaries of more than $80,611 (2).

A career as an elevator inspector is a great choice for people with a strong interest in ensuring elevators are safe for public use. Elevator inspectors must have a solid understanding of a variety of lifting and conveying devices and the necessary inspection procedures. Mechanical aptitude, physical stamina, detail orientation, patience, critical thinking, and good problem solving skills are necessary characteristics. Elevator inspectors should have good communication and the ability to work independently and as part of a team. They must be quick on their feet and be able to make effective decisions under stress.

Becoming an Elevator Inspector Requires Training, Start Today

Are you serious about becoming an Elevator Inspector?  Then you need to get the required skills and training to do it! To start your new career, first you must decide what school you want to enroll in, so you need to gather info about potential schools. Use the Degreefinder Course Search tool to find the right course and college for you, and get started towards your new dream job today! If you want more personalized assistance, call (888) 389-7996 TOLL FREE to speak with a DegreeFinders rep who will help you find the best college for you. After you sign up for Secretary school, make sure you fill out and submit the FAFSA so you can take advantage of any financial aid currently available to you!

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